The 105 best movies on Netflix right now

Moonrise Kingdom/Netflix

We guarantee you’ll find something to add to your Netflix queue.

We know the feeling: You’re tired after work and all you want to do is relax and watch a good movie on Netflix. But you have no idea where to start or even what you’re in the mood for. That’s why we’ve curated guides for the best movies on Netflix for nearly every genre we could think of: horror, comedy, indie flicks, rom-coms, serial killers, anime, kids movies, nature documentaries, movies based on true stories, standup specials, TV shows, thrillers, 4k movies and TV shows, and more.

We’ve combined the blurbs from some of those lists and written quite a few more to create this ultimate guide to what to watch on Netflix. We’ll be updating this list monthly, so you can rest assurenetflixd that if you see something you like here, you can quickly add it to your queue.

The 105 best movies on Netflix

1) Boyhood

Screengrab via Boyhood/Netflix

There’s not a lot to say about Boyhood that hasn’t already been said. It’s a masterpiece, an experience unlike any other, and one of the best movies of the century so far. Champion of the understated, director Richard Linklater casually follows the life of Mason (Ellar Coltrane) from childhood to college, checking in with his actors as they aged over a 12-year shooting process. In the Linklater way, eschewing grand, life-changing moments in favor of the everyday business of just living, the film becomes extraordinary in its ordinariness. This is one person’s story, and the beauty in it is that the narrative never focuses on anything other than that person becoming himself—which is, of course, both one of the most ordinary and the most beautiful things anyone can ever achieve. To say that Boyhood works only as an experiment would be shortsighted. It works as a complete and profound work of art on its own, too. —Chris Osterndorf

2)  Goodfellas

YouTube/MovieClips Trailer Vault

If The Godfather is the best movie ever made about the American mob, then Goodfellas is number 1.5. Martin Scorsese’s 1990 classic about Henry Hill (Ray Liotta) and his rise and fall in the Italian-American crime syndicate that ran New York for three decades is as good as it gets. There’s the amazing soundtrack, some of the most iconic sequences in all of cinema, and a fantastic ensemble that includes Robert De Niro as Jimmy “the Gent” Conway and Oscar-winner Joe Pesci as Tommy DeVito, just to name a few. There are no wasted moments in this movie. It’s it’s all forward motion: a delicate, propulsive, sometimes reckless ballet of camera movement and action. In fact, Goodfellas is one of the first movies to cut scenes about doing cocaine to the rhythm of actually being on cocaine. —Chris Ostendorf

3) Full Metal Jacket

Screengrab via Mocieclips Trailer Vault/YouTube

Like all of Stanley Kubrick’s work, Full Metal Jacket is cold, distant, and often disturbing. But Kubrick’s iciness works perfectly for examining the horrors of Vietnam. One of only two films he made in the 1980s (the other was The Shining), Full Metal Jacket redefined the war movie by suggesting that the training process could actually be one of the worst parts of the whole experience. The first half of the story, which finds a group of Marines going through a dehumanizing boot camp, is so good that people often forget the portion that’s actually set in Vietnam. The entire film is expertly crafted and sure to make an impression. Full Metal Jacket is the rare war movie that refuses to make war look even remotely cool, and it’s all the better for it. —C.O.

Photo via LucasFilm

As with the rest of the franchise, Rogue One’s production design is stunning. The tropical base on Scarif is like nothing we’ve seen before, and its sprawling battle scene feels tense and immediate. David Crossman’s costume design fits into the Star Wars universe while distinguishing Rogue One’s place in the beaten-down Dark Ages of the war, with the lead characters dressed in the tough, unwashed garb of guerrilla fighters. Jyn and Cassian look effortlessly badass in their scrubby jackets and layers of grimy shirts, while Baze Malbus and the aging extremist Saw Gerrera contribute sci-fi style with their dented body armor and bulky weapons. As ever, the franchise’s visual world-building is second to none. —Gavia Baker-Whitelaw

5) Boogie Nights

Screengrab via YouTube/MovieclipsTrailerVault

Several Paul Thomas Anderson films from this century (There Will Be Blood, The Master) are so routinely referred to as masterpieces that one can almost forget he had a career before the year 2000. But not only was Anderson as a much a product of the ‘90s indie explosion as fellow auteurs Quentin Tarantino and Wes Anderson, he debatably made the best film out of all of them with 1997’s Boogie Nights. It’s a sprawling, multifaceted depiction of the porn industry in the late ‘70s and early ‘80s. The rise and fall (and sort of rise?) of Dirk Diggler proved to be a coming-out moment for star Mark Wahlberg too, not to mention a brief redemption for Oscar-nominated supporting actor Burt Reynolds, working alongside many of Anderson’s usual players, who all give career highlight performances. The music, the setting, the acting, the story: Boogie Nights is an American story unlike any other. —C.O.

6) The Godfather Saga  

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It’s difficult to even talk about The Godfather without considering the monumental impact it had on cinema and pop culture at large. The first film defined the gangster genre and gave us icons in Al Pacino’s Michael Corleone and Marlon Brando’s Don Vito Corleone. The second film subverted and redefined the expectations set by the first one while also making newcomer Robert De Niro a star. The third film… well, the less said about the third film the better. Regardless, Francis Ford Coppola’s trilogy still stands as one of the finest American movie epics of all time. A defining immigrant story, a revelatory take on the nature of violence, and a profound meditation on family and power, The Godfather is all it’s cracked up to be and more. —C.O.

7) Schindler’s List

Photo via Wikipedia

Schindler’s List is the kind of movie that is so famously wrenching, it’s increasingly harder to find anybody who has actually seen it. Hopefully its presence on Netflix fixes that, because Steven Spielberg’s 1993 epic may still be the defining film about the Holocaust. In addition to winning Best Picture, Schindler’s List cemented Spielberg’s place as not only the populist favorite among his generation of directors but a true master of the artform as well. —C.O.

8) Inglourious Basterds

Screengrab via Movieclips Trailer Vault/YouTube

Inglourious Basterds may not be Quentin Tarantino’s most iconic film (that would be Pulp Fiction.) Nor is it his most fun (that would probably be Jackie Brown). Nor is it his most stylish (the Kill Bills), his most socially conscious (Django Unchained), his most tightly scripted (Reservoir Dogs,) or even his longest (The Hateful Eight). Yet it’s possible that Inglourious Basterds is his best. He says as much himself with the film’s winking last line, delivered into the camera by Brad Pitt’s Lt. Aldo Raine: “I think this just might be my masterpiece.” Inglourious Basterds is a cinematic declaration for the ages. The performances, writing, and directing are all immaculate. More surprising is that the movie feels almost like a play at moments, with certain scenes stretching on for a half an hour at a time. —C.O.

9) Moana

Photo via Walt Disney Animation Studios/YouTube

Moana is so good it belongs in the canon of all time Disney greats. You need to add it to your Watchlist immediately if you somehow missed it when it was in theaters. And then you need to cancel your plans for tonight and watch Moana instead. The film brilliantly reinvents the Disney princess formula while also honoring all the Disney classics you grew up loving. The representation. The Rock. The music from Lin-Manuel Miranda. I could go on, but really, if you haven’t seen the movie yet, just watch it first. —C.O.

10) Jaws

Screengrab via YouTube/Movieclips Trailer Vault

Released on June 20, 1975, it’s often been said that Steven Spielberg’s seminal film about a killer shark effectively killed the more serious era of the “new Hollywood,” ushering in the age of the blockbuster, which continues to reign supreme today. But while Jaws may have been the original summer smash, it shouldn’t be disregarded as silly or frivolous. Jaws is methodical and exacting. Today, it stands as the first real example of Spielberg’s impeccable filmmaking craft, not to mention the source of one of the craziest behind the scenes stories in Hollywood history. In fact, not one but two scripts about the movie’s production recently landed on the much buzzed about Blacklist, which compiles the best unproduced screenplays. —C.O.

11) Spotlight

Screengrab via Movieclips Coming Soon/YouTube

Spotlight is a drama of the old-school model, bringing into comparison gems such as All the President’s Men. It follows the Boston Globe‘s Spotlight team as it exposes the numerous cases of child abuse and molestation by clergymen covered up by the Catholic church in Boston. The Boston Globe went on to win a Pulitzer Prize for their efforts, and the scandal ran so deep that the Archbishop of Boston was forced to step down. If you care about journalism, it’s a must-watch. —Clara Wang

12) Sunset Boulevard

Screengrab via Paramount Movies/YouTube

Sunset Boulevard is both a swan song to the age of silent films and a love story. Silent film star Norma (Gloria Swanson) is wasting away in the era of talkies. She spends her days screening her old movies and being waited on by her former husband Max Von Mayerling (Erich von Stronheim), who was once the greatest silent film director of his time and is now just Norma’s butler. When Joe, a failed screenwriter (William Holden) half her age stumbles into Norma’s life, she begins to fall in love and offers him a job. The sordid sequence of events that follow turn Sunset Boulevard into a fascinating and bleak tale of lost stardom and the perils of unconditional love. —Amrita Khalid

13) The Prestige

Screengrab via YouTube Movies/Disney

The Prestige may not be Christopher Nolan’s most ambitious film or even his most action-packed or most mind-bending, but it does contain examples of everything he does so well. There are layers of twists, heart-stopping visuals, and perhaps most rewarding of all, it falls into the half of Nolan’s filmography where you actually care about the characters. In the lead roles, Hugh Jackman and Christian Bale shine as Robert Angier and Alfred Borden, two illusionists whose quest for revenge and desire to one-up each other takes them down a path of destruction. It’s one of the better movies ever made about the toxic side of competition and rivalry, and over 10 years later, the film’s ending still sends chills down the spine. Plus, David Bowie’s in it. What more do you need? —C.O.

14) Finding Dory

Disney Pixar

If Pixar has lost a little bit of speed on its fastball post-Toy Story 3, Finding Dory is a wily veteran learning how to get by with the offspeed stuff. Dory (voiced by an ever-enthusiastic Ellen Degeneres) goes on her own adventure after getting lost. Dory leans on humor more than its predecessor, aided by great vocal performances from Ed O’Neill, Idris Elba, Kaitlin Olson, and a slew of stars that would make Dreamworks envious. But it doesn’t lack for emotion either, as we expect from the best of Pixar. At its heart, Dory is a story about coping mental illness, and it does right by the material. —Eddie Strait

15) Amélie

Screengrab via Miramax/YouTube

Jean-Pierre Jeunet 2001 film made Audrey Tautou a star, and it’s easy to see why. As the title character, she finds joy in bringing joy to others, quietly pulling strings around Paris to brighten the lives of strangers. She’s not a matchmaker; Amélie’s goal is something bigger. But then she stumbles upon Nino, a man with a similar goal. —Audra Schroeder

16) Blue Is the Warmest Color

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Steeped in controversy upon its release (and for good reason,) Blue Is the Warmest Color is nevertheless a nearly unparalleled achievement in 21st-century filmmaking. Discussions about male gaze and directorial ethics are sure to follow many people’s viewing, but we also don’t get many epic, three-hour lesbian love stories. There are elements of Blue Is the Warmest Color that still feel essential, if for no other reason than that we need more of what the film gets right, even while needing less of what it gets wrong. And of course, there are the performances from lead actresses Léa Seydoux and Adèle Exarchopoulos, who rightfully became the first actors ever to be awarded the Palme d’Or when the film premiered at Cannes. Playing the two halves of young couple Emma and Adèle, Blue Is the Warmest Color’s leading ladies are both so good, it’s not just that they have created an indelible cinematic love story—it’s as if they’ve reinvented the cinematic love story itself. —C.O.

17) Atonement

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Atonement is the kind of old-school tragedy that spans generations, separates lovers, and plunges whole countries into war. Or, to put it another way, it takes itself pretty seriously. However, as opposed to fellow Oscar darlings No Country for Old Men and There Will Be Blood, both released the same year, Atonement at least has some romance to get swept up in. It also has a prestigious (not to mention beautiful) cast, featuring James McAvoy, Keira Knightley, Benedict Cumberbatch, and more. And like most of director Joe Wright’s movies, the cinematography is absolutely stunning, and the score from composer Dario Marianelli won an Oscar. Is Atonement pretentious? Undoubtedly, but that’s part of its charm. —C.O.

18) Beasts of No Nation

Screengrab via Netflix US & Canada/YouTube

Netflix’s first foray into prestige cinema, at least in terms of narrative filmmaking, was this child soldier drama from 2015. Upon its release, Beasts of No Nation immediately declared that in addition to giving you daily doses of ‘90s nostalgia, the streaming giant was committed to socially engaged stories too. Directed by True Detective’s Cary Joji Fukunaga and starring Idris Elba in what should’ve been an Oscar-nominated performance, this is an intense watch but also a rewarding one. If nothing else, it’ll make you aware of how few depictions of Africa we really see onscreen, and how much that needs to be corrected. —C.O.

19) City of God

Screengrab via YouTube Movies/Sony

This 2002 Brazilian film about growing up under corruption, poverty, and violence in Rio de Janeiro moves as fast as a Martin Scorsese gangster movie despite containing enough tragedy for 10 depressing documentaries. Director Fernando Meirelles (with help from co-director Kátia Lund) imbues the film with such a sense of gritty realism, it could only be based on real-life experiences. At the same time, the film is so highly stylized, it’s also a uniquely cinematic experience, whether you watch it at home or in a theater. Instead of being buried under the weight of these contradictions, City of God thrives on them. For anyone interested in doing a deep dive, check out City of God: 10 Years Later, a documentary about the lives of the film’s young actors, which is also on Netflix. Beware though, the follow-up is almost as emotionally draining as the first go-around —C.O.

20) Moonrise Kingdom

Screengrab via Movieclips Trailers/YouTube

If you’ve ever seen a Wes Anderson movie before, you know what to expect here. It’s quirky, it’s got snappy dialog, the images are rendered with painterly precision. But what separates Moonrise Kingdom from his other work is its depiction of childhood. Leads Sam and Suzy are not precocious or pandering, and their relationship is nuanced and honest, despite the usual Andersony quirks. Just as he humanized high schoolers in Rushmore, Anderson again proves he has more respect for young people than most Hollywood filmmakers here. -C.O.

21) Lion

Screengrab via YouTube/Movieclips Trailers

While critics have almost universally praised the first half of Lion for its intense portrayal of Calcutta street life, there’s something kind of exploitative in the film’s focus on poverty. But the second half of the film, which focuses on a young man in Australia trying to find his way back to the home he doesn’t remember in India, Lion becomes something else entirely. The story’s hero, Saroo (Dev Patel), struggles to reconcile the privilege of his current life, mainly the love of his adopted parents (Nicole Kidman and David Wenham) and girlfriend (Rooney Mara), with the life he lost as a child. With a little help from Google Maps, he begins to obsessively search for the village he was born in. All that Googling might not sound exciting, and some of it is a little dull, but it’s contemporary story this hones in on globalization and technology. —C.O.

22) V for Vendetta

Screengrab via DC Entertainment/YouTube

V for Vendetta’s politics are not subtle, but subtlety isn’t all that effective when you’re aiming for revolution. An underrated classic from the Wachowski siblings, V for Vendetta’s impact has reached farther than most would’ve expected, even showing up in imagery from the Arab Spring. Over 10 years later, its message regarding the fight against tyranny sadly feels more relevant than ever, which makes the film as necessary as ever, too. —C.O.

23) Kubo and the Two Strings

Screengrab via MovieClips Trailers/YouTube

Kubo and the Two Strings faced stiff competition for Best Animated Film of 2016, going up against Disney heavyweights like Zootopia and Moana. But in a different year, Laika’s stop-motion tale about a young boy forced into battle with the ghosts of his family’s past may have swept the awards circuit. Yes, it was a financial failure, but it was a beautiful one nonetheless. Make sure to stick around for the credits, which feature a haunting new rendition of “While My Guitar Gently Weeps” as well as a glimpse into the film’s animation process. —C.O.

Screengrab via Netflix/YouTube

It’s the year of the Stephen King adaptation, and Gerald’s Game might be the best one. Mike Flanagan (Hush, Oculus) takes a novel that has long been considered unfilmable and imbues it with tension and emotion. Carla Gugino gives a standout performance as Jessie, a woman who is left handcuffed to a bed in a remote cabin after her husband Gerald (Bruce Greenwood) dies unexpectedly. The bulk of the film concerns her survival and how deep into the past she can go, and it actually improves upon the novel. —A.S.

25) Dead Poets Society

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Peter Weir’s film about a teacher (Robin Williams) who uses poetry to connect with his students is incredibly earnest, wearing its heart on its sleeve and daring you not to cry. While the movie’s pseudo-intellectualism doesn’t play as well as “serious drama” today, Williams’ performance is lovely, and the young actors, including Ethan Hawke and Josh Charles, all do solid work. You have to be a real scrooge not to feel something during the “O Captain! My Captain!” scene. —C.O.

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26) Hot Fuzz

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Edgar Wright fans might debate which entry in the Cornetto trilogy was his best. The fan favorite remains the slacker zombie spoof Shaun of the Dead, but I vastly prefer Hot Fuzz, Wright’s second entry in the saga starring Simon Pegg and Nick Frost. A deft send-up of Michael Bay movies and buddy-cop flicks, Hot Fuzz is at its best when it gets downright weird in its inspired third act. The British comedians—who, this time around, play mismatched police officers—go Rambo on a stuffy British village that may or may not be a front for a cult. —N.L.

27) The Road

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This is a bleak, devastating film, with no real sweet spot. If that appeals to you, then The Roadadapted from Cormac McCarthy’s novel of the same nameis a solid look at humanity in upheaval. Viggo Mortensen and Kodi Smit-McPhee play a father and son traversing a terrifying, no-rules dystopia after an unnamed event has devastated the country. Director John Hillcoat set the tone with 2005’s The Proposition. –A.S.

28) Delicatessen

Screengrab via YouTube Movies/Lionsgate

This surrealist post-apocalyptic black comedy by future Amélie director Jean-Pierre Jeunet is as playful as a film about cannibalism can be. Deeply influenced by the dark fairy tales of Terry Gilliam, Delicatessen never veers into horror territory, no matter how dark the story gets. Despite its low budget, Delicatessen still looks stunningly beautiful. J.M.B.

Screengrab via Movie Trailers/YouTube

A South Korean riff on Inception, Lucid Dream follows a journalist, Dae-ho, working to find his son, who was kidnapped three years earlier. The investigation has gone cold, but an experimental technique allows Dae-ho to relive the day his son was taken through lucid dreaming. For a premise as inherently grim as a parent searching for a lost child, Lucid Dream is surprisingly fun. The investigations taking place in dreamland and the real world intersect in interesting ways and the story is constantly upping the stakes. —Eddie Strait

30) The Jungle Book

As a director, Jon Favreau specializes in making broadly appealing movies. Ever since Elf he’s primarily made blockbusters, both original (Cowboys & Aliens) and based on someone else’s IP (Iron Man). Working in the later category, his live-action retelling proved to be much more than a cash grab. The visual effects are incredible, and it’s worth seeing the movie just to soak in the stunning imagery. Add in some noteworthy voice work (Idris Elba stands out in a sea of great vocal performances) and a strong debut for child actor Neel Sethi as Mowgli, and the result is one of 2016 most successful crowd-pleasers. —E.S.

31) Metropolis

Metropolis, a silent German film, is essential viewing for science-fiction fans. The futuristic utopia that Freder, the son of the city’s master, lives in is heavenly until he learns about the workers who operate the machines vital to the city’s existence and strives to help them. —M.J.

Photo via Alan Vecchi/Netflix

This well-executed Brazilian shoot-em-up flick cuts no corners in telling its serpentine story and spares no gory details. Branded as O Matador outside of the United States, the film stars Portuguese actor Diogo Morgado as Cabeleira, a manchild assassin searching for his adopted father through the lawless badlands of Pernambuco. —Kahron Spearman

33) Sing Street

Sing Street is simply lovely and one of the best movies on Netflix. From Once director John Carney, this story of a teenager who starts a band to impress the girl who’s too cool for him is archetypal in premise but sublime in execution. Music and relationships take center stage in all of Carney’s films, and Sing Street is no exception. Every one of the original songs is great, but the sequence that features “Drive It Like You Stole It” is one of the best scenes in any movie from 2016. No disrespect to La La Land, but Sing Street should have easily taken one of its slots in the original song category. —C.O.

34) Exit Through the Gift Shop

Screengrab via ENTRTNMNT/YouTube

Is it an elaborate prank or a piece of high-performance art? Is it an inviting work of genius, or is it subtly poking fun at everyone who views it? These questions apply to both Exit Through the Gift Shop as a work of art and to the art world the film depicts. Directed by the ever-enigmatic Banksy, this documentary begins as a co-exploration of the street art movement, and the French shopkeeper who sought to capture it, Thierry Guetta (a.k.a. Mr. Brainwash). But when Banksy decides halfway through the movie that Thierry might not be, so to speak, the ideal candidate to make the definitive movie on this movement, Exit Through the Gift Shop’s narrative takes an unexpected turn. The film eventually becomes a meditation on the idea of authenticity in an art culture that is increasingly commercialized. If that sounds too esoteric for you, don’t worry, Exit Through the Gift Shop is also riotously funny and at times utterly unbelievable. —C.O.

35) Frances Ha

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Noah Baumbach is having an incredibly prolific late career—churning out Greenberg, The Squid and the Whale, Mistress America, Margot at the Wedding, and While We’re Young in an amazing decade-long stretch. During that span, he also made Frances Ha, a riff on Annie Hall as seen through the lens of Godard, Truffaut, and the masters of the French New Wave. Instead of watching a couple slowly drift apart, Baumbach tracks the dissolution of a best friendship between Frances (Greta Gerwig, in her star-making role) and Sophie (Mickey Sumner). It’s not only a lovely Woody Allen homage but one of cinema’s best portraits of millennial disaffection to date. —N.L.

36) High-Rise

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Ben Wheatley’s adaptation of J.G. Ballard’s 1975 novel didn’t see much movement in theaters, but then it’s not really a movie for everyone. Ballard’s tale of an apartment building that devolves into class warfare, floor by floor, is still pretty relevant in 2016, and Wheatley (who previously directed the impeccable Kill List) adds his trademark dread and style to the proceedings, which include decadent parties and dead dogs. Tom Hiddleston, as lightly chilled protagonist Robert Laing, attempts to break down what this literal class warfare means but gets lost in the mania, narcissism, and the need to belong. It’s a beautiful set piece, even if it lacks some of the novel’s philosophical corners. —A.S.

37) Memento

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Christopher Nolan’s crafty 2000 thriller is an early indication of future brilliance. It’s also refreshingly small compared to the blockbusters he would go on to make later in his career. Told backward, Memento stars Guy Pearce as Leonard, a man with anterograde amnesia, a condition that erases short-term memory. Upon first viewing, the structure and the twist ending are enough to blow you away. But Memento is worth coming back to for its performances and philosophical themes. If you can’t remember the things you do, how do you know who you really are? —C.O.

38) The Babadook

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In Jennifer Kent’s 2014 film, the mother is supposed to be the protector, but she might be the monster, too. This tangled duality pushes The Babadook, a film that takes the idea of a bogeyman and draws a thick black line to the depths of our subconscious. Essie Davis is wonderful as Amelia, a single mother who’s slogging through life with her troubled, high-strung son. Their relationship starts to shift after a creature in a children’s pop-up book starts appearing outside the pages and becomes a terrifying metaphor for grief and depression. It joins a handful of recent horror films (The Witch, It Follows, Ex Machina) in which women aren’t just prey or victims. -A.S.

39) The Shawshank Redemption

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Seen today as a modern classic, The Shawshank Redemption bombed at the box office but thankfully still received an Oscar nomination for Best Picture. Sentenced to life in prison for the murder of his wife, unassuming banker Andy Dufresne just wants to do his time and stay out of the way. Despite his best efforts, trouble and friendship find him behind bars, changing the lives of his fellow cellmates both within and outside the prison walls. Based on a Stephen King novella, The Shawshank Redemption is a feel-good film from the mind of a horror master. —J.M.B.

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40) Magic Mike

When this Steven Soderbergh film debuted in 2012, who knew it would reach midnight-movie levels of (feminist) fandom? Channing Tatum drew from real-life experience to shape the titular stripper, and the film explores sexuality, identity, and commerce from a different angle. Plus: abs! —A.S.

41) Kill Bill: Vol. 1 and 2

YouTube/MovieClips Trailer Vault

People have critiqued Kill Bill for the same reason they’ve critiqued much of Quentin Tarantino’s cinema, accusing it of being soulless, all style over substance. But the saga of the Bride and her quest to avenge her daughter has maybe the most heart of any story Tarantino has ever told. And even if you do find these films to be all style over substance, wow, talk about style. The legendary Crazy 88 battle in the first movie is one of the most thrilling fight sequences ever captured on film. Meanwhile, the more understated second volume expands the world into spaghetti Western territory while going deeper into the Bride’s backstory and motivation. Uma Thurman was robbed of an Oscar for both the physical and emotional work she did in these movies. —C.O.

42) Milk

Screengrab via Focus Features

Milk is a sad movie because it shows you how hard the gay rights movement had to fight for the most basic respect. It’s a sad movie because the rights that were being fought for are still too often unrecognized in this country today. It’s a sad movie because Harvey Milk gave his life for what he believed in, and anytime a good man dies fighting for something he believes in, those that would carry on their fight must naturally mourn first. But it’s not an entirely sad movie because Harvey Milk also lived a life worth celebrating. —C.O.

43) Dallas Buyers Club

YouTube/TIFF

As a movie about LGBTQ subject matter, Dallas Buyers Club leaves something to be desired. Not only does it omit elements of the real Ron Woodroof’s story, it fails to clearly define whether Rayon, the film’s second lead, is transgender, a cross-dresser, or identifies in some other non-binary way. Where Dallas Buyers Club does succeed is in its depiction of the AIDS crisis, stigmatization that came with an HIV-positive diagnosis, and the far-reaching effects it had in the ‘80s and ‘90s. Matthew McConaughey and Jared Leto’s Oscar-winning performances as Woodroof and Rayon, respectively, are also among the best of their careers (particularly in Leto’s case), and the direction from Jean-Marc Vallée (Big Little Lies) is stunning. —Chris Osterndorf

44) Mr. Roosevelt

noelkristi/YouTube

In her directorial debut, Noel Wells (Master of None, SNL) plays Emily Martin, a struggling YouTube-famous comedian who hastily moves back to her hometown of Austin and has to adjust to the new relationships around herand the death of a cat. It’s a love letter to a time and place, though not exactly a love story. Emily is directionless, but her self-discovery includes some very relatable moments and a great Holly Hunter impression. A.S.

45) Fruitvale Station

Screengrab via Screen Time/YouTube

Given the country we live in, any drama about the shooting of an unarmed black man by a law enforcement officers is sure to stir up emotions. This one, based on the 2008 killing of Bay Area citizen Oscar Grant, is no different from any other—except it is. Like all stories of police violence against the black community, Fruitvale Station’s details are unique while also fitting into a larger pattern. What makes the film work is that director Ryan Coogler (who was just 26 when Fruitvale Station debuted at Sundance) chooses to focus on the last few hours of Oscar Grant’s life, rather than just the moments surrounding his death. In that way, the movie becomes equal parts celebration and indictment. Fruitvale Station was a monumental debut on Coogler’s part, as well as a turning point for star Michael B. Jordan (who had previously appeared on such TV shows as The Wire, Friday Night Lights, and Parenthood).  Fruitvale Station is still a devastating breakout. —C.O.

John P. Fleenor/Netflix

A Futile and Stupid Gesture, Netflix’s feature film adaptation of Josh Karp’s 2006 book of the same name, is an exploration of the creation of humor mag National Lampoon and its odd-couple co-founders, Henry Beard (Domhnall Gleeson) and Doug Kenney (Will Forte), it’s removed enough from its 1970s origins to offer new insight into its generational influence—and it also recontextualizes satire in an era littered with “fake news.” —Audra Schroeder

Screengrab via Netflix

Of all the films on this list, The Commitments is the one you’re least likely to have seen. It was a small hit when it came out that never got much love on cable. That means you’re in for a surprise treat. Jimmy, an aspiring band manager in Dublin, has a stroke of genius one day and sets out to give Dublin its first soul band. At first, the working-class community isn’t sold, but through the power of song and a streetcar conductor who sings like Otis Redding, he brings together the finest soul band Ireland has ever seen. The music in The Commitments is an achievement on its own, mixing soul and pub rock into a sound that’s its own while also paying loving tribute to the songs being covered. —J.M.B.

48) Mulan

Sixteen years before Moana, Disney laid the groundwork for a culturally conscious “princess” movie with Mulan. And sure, some elements of the movie look dated today, and if it came out in 2017, it would surely be roasted for not being progressive enough. But that doesn’t change the fact that Mulan is one of Disney’s best movies, featuring a thrilling story, great characters, gorgeous animation, and one of its most complex heroines ever. It’s also worth watching for the showstopping classic “I’ll Make a Man Out Of You” alone. Oh, and Mulan has a mom, who’s actually alive—a totally revolutionary concept for Disney at the time! —C.O.

49) Lincoln

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Daniel Day-Lewis is completely believable in the title role, downplaying the grandeur Abraham Lincoln is usually depicted with in favor of vulnerability and uncertainty. Tony Kushner’s screenplay, adapted from Doris Kearns Goodwin’s Team of Rivals, sings with wit and wisdom, turning behind-the-scenes wheeling and dealing into a Schoolhouse Rock “how a bill becomes a law” mix of education and entertainment. And Steven Spielberg’s usual sentimentality is tampered down just enough to allow for a poignancy rarely seen in this kind of prestige pic. Lincoln may take place during the most polarized period in American history, but in comparison to our political climate today, it’ll make you feel positively inspired about the power of government. —C.O.


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50) Wedding Crashers

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Wedding Crashers is a pretty traditional romantic comedy underneath its tawdry premise. There’s a real charm hidden among all those crass gags—many of which are still pretty hilarious today. It has one of the tightest scripts of any comedy ever made, every joke perfectly timed, every sequence sliding seamlessly into the next. And then there’s the powerhouse cast, including a delightful Rachel McAdams, a zany Isla Fisher, a skeezy Bradley Cooper, an irreverent Christopher Walken, and a sociopathic Will Ferrell, all supporting a never-better Owen Wilson and Vince Vaughn. Yes, this is a movie that shows its age, but that doesn’t mean it won’t bring a smile to your face. —C.O.

51) Hush

Screengrab via Movieclips Film Festivals & Indie Films / YouTube

Hush is an hourlong cuticle-ripper. The 2016 film centers on Maddie (Kate Siegel, who co-wrote the screenplay), a deaf and mute author who lives in a secluded cabin in the woods. And there’s a killer on the loose, wearing a creepy white mask. This premise might sound awfully well-tread, but Hush upends the typical home-invasion thriller by letting us see the threat (The Newsroom’s John Gallagher Jr.) unmasked, forcing the tension to build as Maddie finds different ways to thwart his murderous advances. By immersing us in Maddie’s silent world, the tension is even more palpable, and the fact that she’s a writer of fiction allows the film to expand in some inventive directions, even as her fate remains unsure. —A.S.

52) Little Men

Little Men is the third film in director Ira Sachs’ loose trilogy examining modern urban life. Though his previous two efforts (Keep the Lights On and Love Is Strange) both revolved around gay couples, albeit in very different circumstances, Little Men centers around the friendship of two young teenage boys and how a squabble between their parents threatens to pull them apart. It may not feel quite as of the moment as Sachs’ last few movies, but Little Men still has a lot to say about contemporary New York, specifically how the city’s changing real estate market is pushing people out left and right. Yet Little Men’s more important truths are timeless: friendship is hard but worth it, people come in and out of your life, and you may change for the better even if you don’t get what you really want. —C.O.

53) Carol

Screengrab via YouTube/Movieclips Trailers

Carol is a devastating love story, but it’s also hopeful. The film stars Cate Blanchett in the title role as a ‘50s housewife who’s starting to come into her sexuality, and Rooney Mara as Therese, a young woman who falls for her. As the movie’s lush, gorgeous look washes over the characters, every glance, every gesture, every hint of longing becomes something profound. The story is familiar territory for director Todd Haynes, who also explored forbidden sexuality in “traditional” America with 2002’s Far from Heaven. Either one could rightly be called a melodrama, but while the former heightens emotions, the latter tempers them. Both films are haunting and beautiful, but Carol feels like the masterwork he’s been approaching his whole career. —C.O.

54) The Ip Man Trilogy

Photo via Mandarin Films

Donnie Yen (who audiences will recognize as the blind warrior Chirrut Imwe in Rogue One) stars in the trilogy of biographical martial arts films as real-life Wing Chun master Ip Man, who eventually became Bruce Lee’s teacher. The first film focuses on events that occurred during the Sino-Japanese War, the second film follows Ip after he opened a Wing Chun school in Hong Kong, while the third featured a young Bruce Lee (played by Danny Chan) going to Ip’s Wing Chun school to learn martial arts. While the fights are excellently choreographed and executed, it’s the emotional story that brings it home. —Michelle Jaworski

55) Trading Places

Paramount/The Kobal Collection

John Landis’s Trading Places is essentially ‘80s, spoofing Wall Street just before it reached the apex of “greed is good” mentality. But the Reagan-era politics which helped inform the movie never really went away. One needs only to look at the campaign of Bernie Sanders to see that people have caught on to this, making now the perfect time to give Trading Places another look. In the movie, Eddie Murphy and Dan Aykroyd play an investor and a con artist who, well, look at the title. But what starts off as a sick bet between two millionaires becomes a lesson in empathy. Although the film is certainly looking at class and race struggles through rose-colored glasses, it still manages to be a fun take on serious issues. —C.O.

Photo via Netflix

The Incredible Jessica James opens on something many of us are all too familiar with: a very bad Tinder date. Jessica Williamsplays an aspiring playwright, working through her failures in New York. She’s not above stalking her ex on Instagram or lying to her parents. But Williams gives us a performance that reminds us that we’re all human and that falling down is not something to be ashamed of. In the process, she breathes life into the tired rom-com genre. —Sarah Jasmine Montgomery

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57) Tangerine

So many movies are given infinite resources and still manage to feel so minuscule that they might as well not even exist. Sean Baker’s Tangerine, however, is a testament to how much filmmakers can achieve with very little. Shot on an iPhone, the movie cost relative pennies to make, but Tangerine is a hypnotic, extraordinary film about the friendship between two sex workers. That bond is tested over the course of a very long day, and the plot’s simplicity masks its power. After finding out her boyfriend isn’t faithful, Sin-Dee (Kiki Rodriguez) goes off on a quest to locate his mistress. Meanwhile, Alexandra (Mya Taylor) prepares for a performance at a local club. Filmed on a stretch of Santa Monica known as a nexus of prostitution in the city, Tangerine captures the feel of Los Angeles better than any film I’ve ever seen. It’s simultaneously stylish, low-key, and groundbreaking in its authentic depiction of life on the streets. —N.L.

Screengrab via Netflix/YouTube

Adapted by Rees and co-writer Virgil Williams from Hillary Jordan’s novel, Mudbound traces the stories of two families during WWII, one white, one black. They intersect when the McAllan clan buys the farm the Jackson family has worked on as sharecroppers for years. It’s worth watching Mudbound for its devastating ending alone. It’s impossible to deny that Hollywood is better for taking a chance on filmmakers like Dee Rees and stories like this. —Chris Osterndorf

59) 1922

Screengrab via Netflix/YouTube

There’s yet another Stephen King adaptation landing on Netflix, and this one involves rats and murder. In Zak Hilditch’s take, Thomas Jane plays Wilfred James, a Nebraska farmer who has a crisis of conscience when wife Arlette (Molly Parker) says she wants to move to the city and take their teenage son. What follows is a signature King ghost story but it expands in Jane’s dead-eyed portrayal of Wilfred. Mike Patton provides the anxiety-inducing soundtrack, and it couldn’t have been a better choice. —A.S.

Photo via Netflix

Wheelman stars Frank Grillo as a professional getaway driver who finds himself with $200,000 in his trunk and some very bad people on his tail after a bank job goes pear-shaped. Staged almost entirely within the confines of the car, Wheelman blends an intense neo-noir storyline with a gritty, charismatic lead performance by Grillo. More French Connection than The Fast and the Furious, Wheelman is a ride well worth taking. —David Wharton

61) The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring

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The Fellowship of the Ring is first and best installment in The Lord of the Rings trilogy. It’s the most fun, the most exciting, and contains the most memorable moments of the entire series. J.R.R. Tolkien gave fans maybe the most memorable ensemble in fantasy history with the mismatched group of creatures assembled here, and Peter Jackson brings their quest to life with equal thrills and pathos. If you’ve got a spare three hours and have somehow managed to ignore The Lord of the Rings all these years, you might as well get acquainted now, before Amazon reboots it. —C.O.

62) The Panic in Needle Park

Photo via IMDb

Long before films like Trainspotting, Requiem for a Dream, and Heaven Knows What tackled the subject, director Jerry Schatzberg’s The Panic in Needle Park shined a gritty light on heroin addiction all the way back in 1971. Released just a year before The Godfather came out, The Panic in Needle Park stars Al Pacino as a charming junkie named Bobby and Kitty Winn as his impressionable girlfriend, Helen. Although Panic feels a bit dated and occasionally over the top now, it still paints a stark picture of New York street life at its bleakest. Pacino was as young, charismatic, and handsome as he would ever be here, clearly a star on the rise. But it was Winn who won the Best Actress award when the film premiered at the Cannes Film Festival, despite appearing in few pictures since. Trivia time: the screenplay was co-written by Joan Didion and her husband, John Gregory Dunne, whose older brother, Dominick Dunne, produced the film. The elder Dunne would of course go on to become a famous writer himself, mostly for the major American trials he covered in the second half of his life. —C.O. 

63) The Hateful Eight

Screengrab via YouTube/The Weinstein Company

Long, bloody, and shamelessly self-indulgent, The Hateful Eight is peak Tarantino. The story centers on two bounty hunters and a prisoner who take shelter one night with a group of five other suspicious characters in a Wyoming haberdashery to escape a blizzard. Pasts are explored, secrets are unveiled, and soon bodies start to drop. Tarantino’s mix of provocation and exploitation doesn’t work as well here as it does in some of his other films, and the three-hour runtime makes it a tough sit, even if you saw the roadshow version that contained an intermission. But the movie looks fantastic, shot on 70mm by cinematographer Robert Richardson, and it features a career-high performance from Jennifer Jason Leigh as notorious criminal Daisy Domergue. But the best part of The Hateful Eight hands down is its score, for which composer Ennio Morricone won a much overdue Oscar. —C.O.

64) The Trip to Italy

Screengrab via FilmReailerZone/YouTube

Most of us, at some point in our lives, have taken a long trip with a close friend. During the course of said trip, you probably had some laughs, saw some sights, ate some food, and occasionally, got on each other’s nerves. That’s what makes Michael Winterbottom’s 2010 comedy, The Trip, and its 2014 sequel, The Trip to Italy such delights. Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon play fictionalized versions of themselves, and their dynamic is jokey and light-hearted yet competitive. As Coogan and Brydon make their way first around the English countryside, and then around Italy’s, they spend a lot of time looking at their own lives, and attempting to tackle the big questions. It’s also fascinating how from movie to movie, one man will be up, and the other down, and then it’ll shift. However, these movies are never more at ease than when they are simply letting the two men riff in their own language, as close friends do. —C.O.

65) The Place Beyond the Pines

Screengrab via Focus Features/YouTube

Though not as utterly soul-crushing as his breakout film, Blue Valentine, director Derek Cianfrance’s The Place Beyond the Pines is still a tour de force in sadness. Telling three different stories over two generations, Pines is a movie about the bond between fathers and son and how the choices we make resonate well into the future. Though it falls short of its epic ambitions, the film is a great throwback to the gritty American dramas of the 1970s—not to mention the rare “guy cry” movie, i.e. it has action but will also put you in touch with your emotions. Co-lead Bradley Cooper is good in the movie’s second section, but the film never quite gets over Ryan Gosling’s towering performance in the first. As a carnival bad boy skilled in motorcycle stunts, Gosling (reteaming with Cianfrance here following the success of Valentine) is the tattooed heart of gold at the center of this picture. —C.O.

66) Victoria

Screengrab via Movieclips Film Festivals & Indie Films

Shot entirely in one take, Victoria, sort of like Boyhood, could be accused of being a gimmick movie. But when the so-called “gimmick” is executed this effectively and thrillingly, who cares? Taking place over a single night in Berlin, the film follows the titular Victoria (Laia Costa) as she falls in love, commits a crime, loses everything, and then gains it back. German filmmaker Sebastian Schipper crams a lot into two hours and 18 minutes, but one of the best things about Victoria is that it still pauses to take the occasional breath. These quiet moments are what makes the film so impressive and help it transcend whatever gimmicky expectations audiences might have. —C.O.

67) The Imitation Game

Benedict Cumberbatch stars as Alan Turing, the British mathematician who cracked Germany’s Enigma code during World War II. Turing’s team (filled out by Keira Knightley and Matthew Goode) offers strong support to Turing’s dogged pursuit, and the film gives us a historical sketch of the time and political climateand how one’s sexuality could be used against them. —A.S.

68) Y Tu Mamá También

Back in the days when video stores were still a thing, I rented Y Tu Mamá También on a recommendation from a friend, not knowing what it was about. Given that it had “Mama” in the title, I figured that meant it was family-friendly and invited my mother to watch it with me. (Cut me some slack; I was 14 and really, really dumb.)If you’re familiar with the plot of Y Tu Mamá También, you’re aware that decision was a big mistake: The 2001 Mexican-set drama is about a steamy love triangle between Tenoch (Diego Luna); his best friend, Julio (Gael Garcia Bernal); and his cousin’s wife, Luisa (Maribel Verdú), who is dying of cancer. She accepts an invitation with them to go on a road trip to see a secret beach known as “Heaven’s Mouth,” and their journey quickly turns into a tangled mess of erotic fantasy. The funny thing is that both my mother and I ended up adoring it—although for very different reasons. She liked how boisterous Alfonso Cuarón’s Oscar-nominated screenplay was (loaded with playful, scatological banter between carmates), and I enjoyed the film’s sexual politics, with the movie set against a time of governmental and social upheaval. This is a time in Mexican society when Tenoch and Julio’s gay male friends have boyfriends, which makes the pair’s own erotic encounter all the more dangerous.—N.L.

69) Breakfast at Tiffany’s

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Breakfast at Tiffany’s hasn’t aged especially well, even for a movie made in the early ‘60s. Legendary director Blake Edwards’ take on Holly Golightly falls somewhere in between infantilizing and fetishizing, and the complete erasure of Paul’s sexuality as it’s written in Truman Capote’s novella obscures much of the original work’s importance. However, you’d be hard pressed to find a more iconic image in cinema than Audrey Hepburn in those sunglasses and that little black dress. And despite the liberties the film takes with Capote’s story, George Peppard’s Paul and Audrey Hepburn’s Holly have undeniable chemistry together. It may be an adaptation of its time, but it’s an undeniable classic nonetheless (as is the meme it inspired.) —C.O.

70) Quiz Show

Screengrab via YouTube Movies

In the 1950s, TV quiz shows ruled the airwaves. That is until a lawyer discovered proof that they might all have been rigged. Robert Redford directed this riveting account of the original quiz show scandal, crafting a film that’s genuinely riveting without any life-threatening drama. John Turturro doesn’t get enough leading roles in movies, but his Herbert Stempel is a tragic figure despite playing a man willing to compromise his morals for fame. Quiz Show gazes at a time in America where people still trusted what they saw on TV, but this tale of corruption feels oddly timely. —J.M.B.

71) Mustang Island

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At the start of Craig Elrod’s black-and-white indie drama, Bill (Macon Blair) has been dumped, and he’s not taking it well. He enlists his brother and friend to join him on a road trip to the South Texas coast to help win her back, but of course, things go astoundingly wrong. Some very dark comedy is drawn from their foibles, but Mustang Island also drives home the importance of having people in your life who get you. —Audra Schroeder

72) Under the Shadow

In 1980s Tehran, during the War of the Cities, a mother and daughter stay huddled up in their apartment as their city is bombarded by missiles. The historical horror and PTSD-inducing sights of rockets cracking roofs should be terrifying enough, but then an evil spirit takes interest in the little girl and things go from bad to worse. Directed by Iranian-born Babak Anvari, Under the Shadow deals with the social issues of a woman’s place in a fundamentalist Muslim society as much as it does demonic forces. –John-Michael Bond

Photo via Atsushi Nishijima/Netflix

Noah Baumbach has successfully usurped Woody Allen’s title as the greatest living director of New York comedies. His latest love letter to the Big Apple comes in the form of The Merowitz Stories (New and Selected), a thoughtful meditation on the challenge of letting the pain caused by a parent go. Dustin Hoffman’s Harold Meyerowitz is an aging sculptor, largely overlooked in his time. His children, played respectively by Ben Stiller, Adam Sandler, and Elizabeth Marvel, are all semi-dysfunctional, thanks to Harold’s over or under-involved parenting. As a comedy, it certainly isn’t a laugh riot, but it absolutely leaves an impression. —C.O.

74) The Overnight

Screengrab via Movieclips Film Festivals & Indie Films

There should be more movies about sexual fluidity. But in the meantime, we’ve got The Overnight, a sly little Sundance gem from 2015 by up-and-comer Patrick Brice. Aided by a terrific cast (Adam Scott, Taylor Schilling, Jason Schwartzman, and Judith Godrèche), Brice has made the rare comedy about sex that is smart but not preachy. The story centers on two married couples who meet up one night and let their inhibitions run wild. At just under 80 minutes, it’s a total breeze. Smart, funny, and underseen, skip this one if you don’t like sexual humor, but add it to your My List immediately if you do. —C.O.

75) Bernie

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Richard Linklater’s account of an East Texas murder is a curio, even by his standards. He mixes real interviews with locals of Carthage, Texas, into his fictionalized account of Marjorie Nugent’s murder at the hands of her assistant, Bernie Tiede. Jack Black’s vocal and physical affectations walk the line of caricature, but he never crosses it. He does the best work of his acting career here. Shirley Maclaine matches, and even surpasses, Black’s work as Marjorie. The film is darkly funny and a fascinating look at a relationship gone horribly wrong. —Eddie Strait

76) The Longest Day 

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Telling the story through Allied and German points of view, The Longest Day is a groundbreaking epic of old Hollywood. Its $10 million budget was nearly unheard of in 1962, and until Schindler’s List came out, it remained the most expensive film ever made in black-and-white. The gamble made by power producer Darryl F. Zanuck (The Grapes of Wrath, All About Eve) eventually paid off, as the film went on to gross $50 million and win two Oscars. Not everyone was such a big fan though; Dwight D. Eisenhower apparently walked out of a screening, upset over historical inaccuracies. In addition to John Wayne, look out for the insanely impressive supporting cast, including Paul Anka, Richard Burton, Sean Connery, Henry Fonda, Roddy McDowall, Sal Mineo, George Segal, Rod Steiger, Peter Lawford, Robert Wagner and Robert Mitchum. C.O.

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77) Pariah

It’s a little sad that Pariah is best known for a drunken shout out: When accepting the Golden Globe for The Iron Lady in 2012, Meryl Streep slurred the name of Adepero Oduye, the film’s lead. But inebriated or not, Meryl knows what’s up. Directed by Dee Rees, making her debut, Pariah offers a fresh take on the coming-out story. Giving a star-is-born performance, Oduye plays Alike, a black teenager experiencing her queer coming of age on the streets of Brooklyn, New York. As she soon discovers, figuring out who you are isn’t without difficulty: The girl she likes (Aasha Davis) views their relationship as nothing more than “youthful experimentation.” Meanwhile, her parents force her to choose between her sexuality and her family. For Rees, the little-seen film was the beginning of a promising career: She directed HBO’s Emmy-winning Bessie in 2015 and helmed the network’s Stonewall drama, When We Rise. —N.L.

78) Drinking Buddies

Screengrab via hollywoodstreams/YouTube

The two leads, Luke (Jake Johnson) and Kate (Olivia Wilde), are coworkers at a microbrewery; it’s obvious that they’d probably date each other if they weren’t already dating other people. When Kate suddenly becomes single, it brings their relationship halfway closer to a reality, and you can probably guess where things go from there.

But your guess would probably be wrong. This is a Joe Swanberg movie, heavily rooted in the mumblecore genre, which means it’s going to see your expectations and gleefully choose to ignore them. Without spoiling too much, this isn’t so much a romance film as it is a film about boundaries—and about how that common adage that you should date your best friend is perhaps oversimplifying things a tad. —J.K.

79) Raw

Screengrab via Netflix

Julia Ducournau’s debut feature film is an obstacle course for the senses, and it’s one of the most unique horror films of 2017. Teen vegetarian Justine (Garance Marillier) is cast off to her first year of vet school and endures a hazing ritual that causes her to awaken in several ways. Raw is about a woman coming to terms with her nascent cannibalism but more fundamentally about a woman discovering desire and sisterhood. Marillier gives a stunning performance as she fights and gives in to her urges, and her transformation doesn’t need CGI to be terrifying and ascendant. —A.S.

80) Mountains May Depart

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Tracking a woman over three distinct periods in her life, Mountains May Depart tells a story that feels deeply personal yet intrinsically tied to socio-economic conditions in China. The third segment, which is set in a futuristic Australia and features many non-English speaking actors doing their best to master the language, is a little bit clunkier than the two that precede it. But in many ways, it’s also the best part of the movie, as director Zhangke Jia (always wrestling with ideas of national identity) makes a clear attempt at something bold and audacious. Fans of his previous feature, 2013’s A Touch of Sin, may be surprised at how comparatively tame this film is. Rest assured, though, while it’s not as violent, Mountains May Depart still hits you hard. —C.O.

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81) Pee-wee’s Big Adventure

Netflix released a companion piece to this classic film in 2016—Pee-wee’s Big Holiday—but you’ve got to go back to the source. The 1985 Tim Burton film was the first to showcase the comedic talents of Pee-wee Herman (Paul Reubens) on the big screen, post-Pee-wee’s Playhouse. It gave us Large Marge, the breakfast machine, and a film both kids and adults could hold near and dear. —A.S.

82) Heathers

Screengrab via ObscureTrailers/YouTube

This isn’t a rom-com in the traditional sense, thanks to the line “fuck me gently with a chainsaw,” among other things. But the relationship between Winona Ryder’s and Christian Slater’s characters is one of the more complex to emerge from the ‘80s high school genre. Veronica (Ryder), one of the four popular “Heathers,” finds a mirror in JD (Slater), an outcast who inadvertently hatches a plan that kills one of the Heathers. Their relationship doesn’t have a meet-cute; it’s more about what love (or lust) makes you blind to. —A.S.

83)  Apollo 13

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Ron Howard’s docudrama recounts the incredible story of how NASA raced against time to bring the stranded three-person crew of Apollo 13 back home from space. It’s so fantastic it’s hard to believe you’re watching a true story. Tom Hanks, Bill Paxton, Gary Sinise, and Kevin Bacon give emotional weight to a movie that could easily just have been a thrill ride. Instead, viewers are stuck feeling the dread experienced around the globe as the world tuned in to see if our men would make it. —J.M.B.

84) The Sixth Sense

Photo via Where's the Jump?

“I see dead people.” The very phrase still conjures up memories of one of the greatest movie twists of all time. If by somehow you missed the cultural phenomenon that was The Sixth Sense, Netflix now is the perfect time to catch up, with director M. Night Shyamalan suddenly getting his groove back with recent titles like The Visit and Split. Will he ever make another movie as big as The Sixth Sense? Probably not. But no matter what he’s done in the years since, he can rest easy knowing he made an unforgettable addition to pop culture with this modern classic. C.O.

85) Oldboy

Photo via Tartan Films/Rotten Tomatoes

Based on the Japanese manga, conspiracy and violence are close to the surface as a man is released from a prison cell 15 years after being kidnapped. He’s given money, clothes, a phone, and has a thirst for revenge against the person who kept him captive all those years. —M.J.

86) Force Majeure

Screengrab via Magnolia Pictures & Magnet Releasing/YouTube

In the aftermath of an avalanche, a wife accuses her husband of trying to save himself over his own family as the audience gets a raw and sometimes uncomfortable look at a marriage on the brink of falling apart. It’s a gripping character drama, and there’s even a familiar face in Game of Thrones’s Kristofer Hivju. —M.J.

87) The African Queen

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John Huston, Humphrey Bogart, and Katharine Hepburn teamed up to make this WWI film about a romance between a riverboat captain and a missionary to regain public favor after they publicly spoke up in favor of free speech during the beginning of the Hollywood blacklist. Their efforts worked, and The African Queen became a huge hit, earning Academy Award nominations for Best Director, Best Screenplay, Best Actress, and Best Actor, which Bogart won, marking his first and only Oscar victory. This despite the fact that virtually everyone got sick with dysentery or worse while on set, and Huston was supposedly more preoccupied with shooting an elephant than shooting a movie, as later dramatized in the Clint Eastwood film, White Hunter Black Heart. —C.O.

By the time the American version of The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo was released into theaters in 2011, Sweden had already adapted the entire Millennium trilogy to film (currently streaming as a six-episode season). The original is the superior as Michael Nyqvist and Noomi Rapace portray a suspenseful and thrilling ride that’s every bit as dark as the book itself. —M.J.

89) Batman

Batman Wiki

Tim Burton’s original Batman movie often gets overlooked thanks to the many good (and bad) takes on the caped crusader that followed it. But Burton’s mix of ‘80s excess, ‘50s noir tropes, and references to German expressionism set the template for how artistic a comic book movie could be. He created a dark fairytale version of Gotham City, bathed in gorgeous light and shadow. No one believed in 1989 that Mickael “Mr. Mom” Keaton could convincingly pull off the cape cowl, but he showed them all, not only giving audiences a Batman who was quick-witted and tortured but also showing that Bruce Wayne could be equally so. Then there’s Jack Nicholson’s robber baron Joker, a singular piece of pop culture perfection that put his skill for playing charismatically unhinged characters to use years before Heath Ledger came along with his own iconic spin. Combine all these elements with Danny Elfman’s moody, heart-pounding score (still the best of his career) and you’ve got one of the greatest superhero movies of all time. —C.O.

90) Little Sister 

Screengrab via Movieclips Film Festivals & Indie Films

It’s strange that Little Sister’s examination of Bush-era politics should feel so distant; the country has changed a lot in just under 10 years, and what once felt like national crises almost feel quanit in comparison today. Yet Little Sister’s greatest triumphs are interpersonal, not political. It’s a film about relationships, about how people deal with loss and trauma, about how people change while also somehow staying the same. This 2016 indie dramedy from Zach Clark was too little seen at the box office. Perhaps the premise, revolving around a goth nun who returns home after her Iraq war hero brother is disfigured in combat, was simply to kitschy for some people. But Little Sister is more than quirk or weirdness; it’s a lovely little character piece that is well-acted and smartly written, proving that Clark is a talent to watch. Plus, “goth nun”… come on, you’re kind of interested now, right? —C.O.

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Louis Waters (Robert Redford) has lived a quiet life since his wife’s death years before. Then one night his neighbor, Addie (Jane Fonda), herself a widow of many years, knocks on his door with a simple proposal: “Would you like to sleep with me?” Our Souls at Night would be worth watching even if it was just to see Redford and Fonda working together again, but thankfully, it also serves as a gentle reminder that it’s never too late to find love. Sometimes you just have to get out of your comfort zone and knock on some doors. —David Wharton

92) Experimenter

Screengrab via YouTube

The famous Milgram Experiments tested one question: How far will you go to obey, even if it means hurting someone else? The results were shocking. In 1961, Stanley Milgram (Peter Sarsgaard) conducted a series of radical behavior experiments that tested the willingness of ordinary humans to obey an authority figure while administering electric shocks to strangers. The first half of the film depicts the severity of the experiments as nearly every test subject succumbs to the pressure of the circumstances and administers shocks to a stranger. Between the experiments, Milgram meets the Alexandra, the future mother of his children. —C.W.

93) The Truman Show

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At the time of its release, The Truman Show—about a man stuck in a reality show he doesn’t know he’s participating in—was a biting work of science-fiction satire, dreaming of a world where the growing reality TV genre gave us 24-hour access to a person’s life. Watching it again almost 20 years later, The Truman Show still has all its punch, and maybe a little extra when you factor in our hyperconnected society. This was Jim Carrey’s first major leading dramatic role, and it remains one of the actor’s finest works. —J.M.B.

Sex will kill you. If you went to public school in a red state or have particularly overzealous parents, you’ve probably heard that idea once or twice. In It Follows, the warning is literal. Sex will kill you or, more specifically, will cause an evil spirit to follow you around, hunting you down until you have sex with someone else—like if the tape from The Ring was an STD. It Follows has brilliantly subtle direction that focuses on the characters while saving jumpscares for when they’re absolutely needed. —J.M.B.

95) Zootopia

Photo via Disney

Movies that are equally entertaining for kids and adults are an increasingly rare breed, so when one does come along it looks like a mirage in the Netflix listings. Fear not, Zootopia is the real deal. It’s the story of a bright-eyed rabbit (voiced by Ginnifer Goodwin) who fights off Disney-levels of discrimination to achieve her dream of being a cop. She forms an unlikely alliance with a con man fox (the almost too perfectly cast Jason Bateman) to expose a massive conspiracy. Zootopia is a rock-solid buddy cop comedy, but what really separates it is the social commentary running through the narrative. Sometimes the film bites off a little more than it can chew, but that occasionally happens with ambitious movies and should be embraced here. —E.S.

 96) Meek’s Cutoff

Screengrab via MichelleWilliamsBR/YouTube

Meek’s Cutoff is infuriating but imposing, and no matter what reaction you have to it, it’s likely to be a strong one. But it’s movies that elicit a strong reaction that are also the most worth watching. This western from Kelly Reichardt, one of the most important voices in American indie film, is an unshakeable piece of commentary on the history of America and an incomparable piece of modern filmmaking. Meek’s Cutoff is a must-watch for cinephiles who haven’t found the time yet. —C.O.

97) My Left Foot

Photo via IMDb

My Left Foot tells the story of Christy Brown, an Irish author with cerebral palsy. Through frustration and determination, he learned to write using only (you guessed it) his left foot, making his journey on screen one that is both heartbreaking and inspiring. Daniel Day-Lewis won his first of three Oscars for playing this difficult character, and while the casting of an able-bodied actor for the part might inspire some criticism today, at the time the film all but cemented his reputation as the greatest actor of his generation. It’s one of the best movies on Netflix, but it doesn’t always stick around for long.—C.O.

98) Before Midnight

Midnight is probably the hardest film to watch in Richard Linklater’s Before trilogy, but it’s also probably the best. Released nine years after Before Sunset and 18 years after Before Sunrise, Before Midnight finds Celine and Jesse, the couple at the trilogy’s center, having moved past adolescent romance and youthful desire into middle-aged love… or something like it. The film suggests that ennui, complacency, and resentment are as much a part of growing old with someone as all that “happily ever after” stuff.” Does the third installment’s edge take away from some of the sentiment and passion of the first two? Sure, but in making Celine and Jesse an actual couple, it also finds a surprising beauty in its realism. There’s no word yet on whether Linklater plans to make a fourth instalment, but if we never check in with Celine and Jesse again, it will have been worth it for the sad, funny, poignant look at aging and love we got here. —C.O.

99) The Invitation 

If you missed 2016’s twisty The Invitation, you’re not alone. But you’re also in for a treat. Karyn Kusama’s thriller about a group of friends at a dinner party is simplistic in premise but precise in execution. It’s a movie so intimate, so perfectly claustrophobic, you’ll feel, almost like the characters in the movie, trapped by a kind of relentless dread while watching it. As the plot unfurls and the party stretches on, secrets and ulterior motives are revealed, all the way up to a breathtaking climax. Intense as the experience is, you may immediately want to watch it again, if not because it’s great then at least to make sure you got everything. —C.O.

100) To Kill a Mockingbird

Screengrab via Andrea L./YouTube

Although there are elements of To Kill a Mockingbird that feel dated today, the book and the film’s core principles continue to ring true. Perhaps it’s hard not to look at Atticus Finch differently in light of the 2015’s controversial Go Set a Watchman. Perhaps the text has lost some of its relevance as more black artists have gotten the chance to shape their own narratives over the years. Nevertheless, the film adaptation of Harper Lee’s classic tale of Boo Radley, Scout, and Atticus Finch still tugs at heartstrings all these years later. Gregory Peck’s portrayal of Atticus, in particular, remains an archetype for cinematic “good guy.”  —C.O.

101) Don’t Think Twice

Don't Think Twice: Screengrab via Movieclips Film Festivals & Indie Films/YouTube

Although it was a hit with critics, Mike Birbiglia’s Don’t Think Twice failed to become the crossover hit it should’ve in 2016. Using improv specifically to tell a story about the highs and lows of being a creative person in general, Birbiglia has made a mini-masterpiece, sure to resonate with anyone who has tried (and failed) to put their talent on display for the world to see. The film also gives us another powerhouse performance from Gillian Jacobs, who continues to be spectacular at playing damaged, complicated characters. —C.O.

102) White Christmas

Although the famous Irving Berlin song was first popularized in the 1942 Bing Crosby/Fred Astaire vehicle Holiday Inn, many Americans more closely associate with this 1954 classic, with which it shares a name. Crosby is back, but this time he’s paired up with Danny Kaye. The two play a song-and-dance team who fall for two sisters (Rosemary Clooney and Vera-Ellen). The plot is as silly as you might expect, but the songs, again supplied for Berlin, are wonderful, and the movie is a delightful old-timey treat to watch around the holidays. —C.O.

103) Okja

Screengrab via Netflix/YouTube

Bong Joon-ho’s Okja is an odd and oddly touching story about a girl, Mija, and her genetically enhanced superpig, Okja. Set in Korea and the U.S., Okja features a diverse cast, thrilling set pieces, and enough emotional moments to keep you engaged even when the film indulges its weirder aspects. Despite the film’s tonal shifts, Joon-ho’s agility and prowess as a filmmaker ties everything together and makes it feel if a piece. Okja is easily the best Netflix original movie to date. —E.S.

Screengrab via Netflix/YouTube

It may be hard to convince yourself sit down for a harrowing story about a young woman’s struggle with anorexia. Despite To the Bone’s dour subject matter, Marti Noxon’s script has enough humor to act as a release valve, and it’s one of the best movies on Netflix.. The performances from lead actress Lily Collins to supporting players Alex Sharp, Keanu Reeves, Retta, and Lily Tomlin are great. The story is based on Noxon’s past experiences and that comes through in the intimate and empathetic approach she takes. —E.S.

Photo via Netflix

Ennui, violation, ham-fisted vengeance: It all comes together in Macon Blair’s directorial debut, starring Melanie Lynskey and Elijah Wood as two amateur detectives looking for justice in a world gone mad. —Audra Schroeder

Editor’s note: This story is regularly updated for relevance. 

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We know the feeling: You’re tired after work and all you want to do is relax and watch a good movie on Netflix. But you have no idea where to start or even what you’re in the mood for. That’s why we’ve curated guides for the best movies on Netflix for nearly every genre we could think of: horror, comedy, indie flicks, rom-coms, serial killers, anime, kids movies, nature documentaries, movies based on true stories, standup specials, TV shows, thrillers, 4k movies and TV shows, and more.